Good Trouble issue 22
Delivered to Stack subscribers in Aug 2018

by Lucy Corkish in August 2018

Print has always been adjacent to protest. From 90s punk zines to new age feminist titles, magazine makers rebel against mainstream publishing because they have something different to shout about. Good Trouble is edited by former Dazed and Confused editor Rod Stanley, and designed by Richard Turley (Bloomberg Businessweek, MTV, Interview, etc) and it’s a big, broadsheet magazine covering the intersection of creativity and resistance. Read on for our interview with ‘Ultimate Behemoth’ Rod to see what it’s all about…

Name 
Rod Stanley

Job title
Ultimate Behemoth

What is Good Trouble?
It is a magazine disguised as a broadsheet newspaper that ‘celebrates the culture of resistance’.

What makes it different to the rest?
Serious subjects without taking itself too seriously. Looks good. Ink comes off on your fingers.

Who makes Good Trouble?
A shadowy netherworld of malcontents, miscreants and ne’er-do-wells.

Who reads it?
People interested in arts and creativity as a cultural weapon for social change.

Why do you work in magazines?
Because what the world clearly needs now is more ultra-niche DIY zines.

Aside from the print magazine, what else are you involved in?
Currently, a Sri Lankan Dal with Coconut and Lime Kale.

What would you change about Good Trouble if you could?
More pages each issue.

Where do you see Good Trouble in five years?
All other magazines will have closed. Only Good Trouble will survive, publishing six times a day.

www.goodtroublemag.com




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