Delivered by Stack, May 2017:Anxy

Anxy wants to explore our inner worlds. The magazine, published by a wide, diverse team with notable accolades, set out to encourage open and honest conversations on mental health. It can be stress, anxiety, depression, or anger — Anxy wants to tell all kinds of stories affecting all kinds of people. Read on for our interview with their founder.

Name
Indhira Rojas

Job title
Founder and creative director of Anxy magazine

What is Anxy?
Anxy explores our inner worlds through a personal and creative lens. We get people together to talk openly and honestly about their mental health, about their lives, and about the situations that lots of us face every day but are often afraid to admit. Each issue takes a theme and looks at it through a range of different perspectives, and hopefully finds some unexpected angles that encourage you to understand more about your own life.

What makes it different to the rest?
Most of the magazines that are out there about mental health are either focused on self-help, problem-solving, or aimed at professional psychologists. Most writing on the internet, on the other hand, is deeply personal but pretty much ephemeral. Anxy creates a space that exists between and beyond these things — people telling all kinds of stories in all kinds of ways. And you won’t be embarrassed to be seen reading it.

Who makes Anxy?
We’ve got a core team of amazing designers, artists, editors, and photographers, who have done great work before at places like Medium, The Bold Italic, Matter and the Guardian. Plus we have been lucky to draw the support of a great community of readers and contributors. It’s a team effort.

Who reads it?
There is no typical Anxy reader, but most of our readers are creative people who are interested in living a better life. They’ve really dialled in to the way we’re trying to approach the issues.

Why do you work in magazines?
We’ve all spent a lot of time making media of all kinds, especially in the digital world. It’s a lot of fun. But there’s something about making physical objects — things that you can bump into in your real life, things that allow you the time and focus away from the distractions of the screen — that really connects with the idea of living our lives a little better. Besides, nothing can replace beautiful type and imagery on paper, with that warm smell of fresh print.

Aside from the print magazine, what else are you involved in?
I’ve been running a design practice for the past few years under Redindhi Studio. Now, with the success of Anxy and the wonderful team we’ve built, we starting to expand and explore building a publishing studio. We’re excited about creating a range of different projects online and offline, and inventing new things, both for commercial clients and as independents, following our own interests and passions.

What would you change about Anxy if you could?
The support we’ve had from people even before the first issue has been so incredible, it’s really been powerful. But we wish everybody knew about us. It’s not unique to Anxy, of course, it’s a problem that every independent magazine wishes they could tackle. Our stories can be a source of solace and inspiration for people — we wish nothing more than for these stories to be shared as far and wide as possible.

Where do you see Anxy in five years?
In five years, we would like Anxy to be an established publication. For us, that means being a sustainable business with a strong following and community from all around the world. We dream of going beyond print and digital, into creating events, podcasts and compelling collaborations that bring mental health and art. Making the magazine more accessible by translating into different languages is also an aspiration of ours, starting with Spanish, and growing from there.

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